Political bias must stop

0
224
Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Personally, when a country starts to develop at full scale, citizens begin to constructively criticize the modus operandi of government and its officials regarding the welfare of the masses. My position as a government critic, especially this NPP – @NAkuffoAddo-led administration, has always been conservative of any political bias. Some people following my post may feel or even believe I am a political propagandist, working for a particular political party. I respect people’s opinions, because, just like ass-holes, we all have some. Let me state it in clear terms and also in my local language that I HATE POLITICIANS. I don’t feel I really need to give reasons why I do, as it has been obvious in the public discourse how they play politics with everything, now even with our lives. It has been in the news lately, well much before that, somewhere in the run up to the 2016 general elections when the previous administration, the then Mahama-led government procured some number of vehicles, that were said to have been substandard as per World Health Organisation’s criterion of an ambulance; and so those vehicles bought with our money have been allegedly bastardized by the current government pending investigations into financial malfeasance in procurement process. If we could all recall the current trend of “wahalas” in and around public health facilities across the country, quite a number of lives have been lost due to the lack of ambulances to convey patients to health facilities in time to receive medical attentions. Quite recently, last month June 30, we lost our former Vice President of the immediate past administration, H.E. Paa Kwesi Bekoe Amissah-Arthur, after he was said to have collapsed in the gym during a routine workout. Efforts to resuscitate him through CPR, first, and then calls to get an ambulance service to convey him to a healthcare facility failed. In an account of one of the highly respected custodians of our land, in the person of Okyehene himself gave his own account of how the dying body of the former VEEP had to be thrown into a pickup bucket when they couldn’t get any ambulance. Let’s pause for a moment and think about this critically. Okay, “midzo” – let’s proceed! In the preceding discourse of this whole no ambulance brouhaha, the in-charge of the Ghana Ambulance Service of the Ghana Health Service stated their position of “broken-down ambulances” to “no ambulances” in their departments; however the vehicles procured for them to use as ambulances by the previous government cannot be used as ambulances. According to him, they “are not going to use vehicles as ambulances that patients would be dropping from”….and that the vehicles after inspecting them “do not meet the WHO criteria for ambulances” and can only be used to carry dead bodies. I am not sure that public officials, especially people we regard as HEALTH WORKERS could be this shallow – excuse my Dagaati! This officer was able to voice this out even after hearing Okyehene’s account of how the “dying vice president’s (former, now deceased) body was thrown into a pickup truck bucket” and driven to the hospital where he was later pronounced dead after further efforts to revive him failed. I have never had the balls to go close to the School of Medical Sciences because of my hatred for the profession. My grandma told me the profession is nothing but a bunch of instructed common sense and since she gave me some principles that would enable me make use of much later in life, I forgo the choice to venture into Medicines, and rather accrued more intel on the use of herbs. (Hahaha!). Back to the main issue. I have been around few hospitals, but only to observe how things are done, and on more than several occasions, I have seen how taxis and even “kekevi” (wooden trucks) and tricycles are used to convey patients to hospitals for treatments. I don’t know what requirements the World Health Organisation (WHO) has given the ambulance department of the Ghana Health Service as conditions suitable and fit for a vehicle to be used as an ambulance, which deterred these heartless incompetent public servants for the past (over 19) months from using the said vehicles as ambulances, when we have to resort to “kekevis” and taxis to carry our patients to and fro health facilities. When I heard this man spoke when he was interviewed, my heart gave up on the human sensitivity inside of some people especially the people employed and being paid with our tax monies to take care of our health and medical needs. That is why it is not surprising, in my candid opinion, that this man still wakes up, stares his wife and children in the face and tell them he is off to work, because ostensibly the question of “what type of work he does” eludes the governing body that recruited and employed these types of individuals onto the government payroll knowing too well how much majority of these recruits lack simple innovative ideas. I have not traveled much, except for Klikor to Agblekpui on bird and mice catching expeditions, but I am convinced, by my instinct, that if this were to happen in a COMPETENT JURISDICTION, somebody, a group of persons or even an entire organisation would have resigned pending legal ramifications already, but that would never happen in this country Ghana, where a group of people boldly tout how it is their government in power, and so nobody can dictate how they should do their works, while you and I are “forced through the eye of a needle” instead of the proverbial horse that the Bible gave account of. What I would love for us all to carefully deliberate on today is “how long must we continue to relinquish our THUMB POWER to politicians who practically and evidently do not have our welfare and survival, but their own selfish interests, at heart?”

Please think on this for as long as you see fit, and be advised.

“Akpe na mi gede” (thank you very much).

Marc Oscar – Mr One Zed .

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here